Back In The Days Of Tanners And Bobs

Back In The Days Of Tanners And Bobs

Back in the days of tanners and bobs,

When Mothers had patience and Fathers had jobs.

When football team families wore hand me down shoes,

and T.V gave only two channels to choose.

Back in the days of threepenny bits,

when schools employed nurses to search for your nits.

When snowballs were harmless; ice slides were permitted

and all of your jumpers were warm and hand knitted.

Back in the days of hot ginger beers,

when children remained so for more than six years.

When children respected what older folks said,

and pot was a thing you kept under your bed.

Back in the days of Listen with Mother,

when neighbours were friendly and talked to each other.

When cars were so rare you could play in the street.

When Doctors made house calls; Police walked the beat.

Back in the days of Milligan’s Goons,

when butter was butter and songs all had tunes.

It was dumplings for dinner and trifle for tea,

and your annual break was a day by the sea.

Back in the days of Dixon’s Dock Green,

Crackerjack pens and Lyons ice cream.

When children could freely wear National Health glasses,

and teachers all stood at the FRONT of their classes.

Back in the days of rocking and reeling,

when mobiles were things that you hung from the ceiling.

When woodwork and pottery got taught in schools,

and everyone dreamt of a win on the pools.

Back in the days when I was a lad,

I can’t help but smile for the fun that I had.

Hopscotch and roller skates; snowballs to lob.

Back in the days of tanners and bobs.

Author: XGemx

3 thoughts on “Back In The Days Of Tanners And Bobs

  1. Back in the days of tanners and bobs,
    When Mothers stayed home and weren’t allowed to have jobs
    When families had rations and food deprivation,
    And TV had only the choice of two stations.

    Back in the days of three penny bits,
    when schools employed nurses to search for your nits.
    The pupils with dyslexia would go unsupported.
    And signs of abuse ignored and unreported.

    When wife beating was common and divorce not permitted
    She took the abuse and just sat home and knitted.
    Before contraception, or abortion as a choice.
    Women had no rights, no vote and no voice.

    Back in the days of hot ginger beers,
    when children remained so for more than six years.
    But then married as teens and mothers just after.
    No uni days of learning and laughter.

    When children respected what older folks said,
    And took blows to the ears and clips round the head.
    The teachers all stood at the FRONT of their classes,
    Ah how we look back with our rose-tinted glasses.

    When cars were so rare you could play in the street.
    When Doctors made house calls and Police walked the beat.
    But vaccines were rare and chemo unheard of
    And now-treatable diseases, everyone was afraid of.

    Your annual break was a day by the sea.
    And fun as that was, much better to be
    Able to take children to new countries and places
    And experience their culture, new people, new faces.

    Back in the days of racism and hate,
    Colonial slaves, but Britain was “great”.
    Before social mobility, the poor had no worth,
    We all knew a mother who died giving birth.

    Back in the days of rocking and reeling,
    when mobiles were things that you hung from the ceiling.
    No online bullying, that much it true
    But with technology, how our lives grew.

    When woodwork and pottery got taught in schools,
    But if you’re not clever you’re labelled a fool.
    And forced to wear dunce caps and stand up in shame
    And scolded and whipped and given the cane.

    Back in the days of Listen with Mother,
    when neighbours were friendly and talked to each other.
    Unless you were black, or gay, or queer,
    Before we had pride, they just lived in fear.

    Back in the days when I was a lad,
    I can’t help but smile for the fun that I had.
    But thank god my kids have a better situation,
    Let’s continue to improve for our future generation.

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